divine proportion

Divine Proportion in the World of Matter

“It has always been known that the Greek craftsmen made use of a secret canon of proportion, revealed only to initiates, which they inherited from the Egyptians, who had preserved it from deepest antiquity. Blavatsky refers to it as the lost canon, and so it remained until it s partial rediscovery earlier this century by the American, Jay Hambidge. For many years Hambidge wrote and lectured on the geometrical types which determined the proportions of Greek vases, paintings,sculpture and which are also the basic model of plant growth and of the human skeleton. … His attempts to persuade artists and architects of the advantages to be gained from using the canonical proportions in design were generally unsuccessful. Artists, encouraged by a fragmented society to regard themselves as great individuals of original genius, have not in modern times cared to study the eternal gods of visual harmony.” ~John Michell

Divine Proportion

Mr. Michell wrote the above quote in his book “City of Revelation” in 1972. I believe he was fortunate enough to see a revival to some degree of respect for the ancient canon of proportion. Perhaps his books and teachings helped with that revival. In any case, what most call Divine Proportion is a real thing and respect for it is making a comeback.

Divine proportion may be complicated in practice, but is simple to understand. It simply means that certain proportions are more harmonious, more pleasing, than others. While there may be good, practical reasons to make things in other shapes, divine proportion is always best when possible. First, of course, one has to spend time studying the rules of divine proportion in order to follow them.

Greeks and Egyptians

The Greeks did get many of their ideas from the Egyptians, including those of divine proportion. The Greek philosopher and spiritual teacher Pythagoras was particular known for his insistence that geometry was a sacred science, not simply mathematics.

And this divine proportion geometry can be seen in nature as well as in things made by man. In the geometry of snowflakes, the arrangements of leaves o plants, and so on.

Many examples of divine proportion can be found in Egyptian art and architecture. But as Mr. Michell notes, they got the knowledge from even older civilizations. And that doesn’t just mean the Babylonians. It also means older civilizations that science doesn’t except, but they existed anyway. Civilizations like those of Atlantis and Lemuria. Civilization that all knew the laws of divine proportion and tried to follow them whenever possible. Continue reading “Divine Proportion in the World of Matter”

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Dynamic geometry

Dynamic Geometry and Learning Truth

“Teachers in the centers of education throughout the ancient world, such as that founded by Pythagoras at Croton, understood that is is impossible for anyone to learn anything until he has experienced its truth for himself, and therefore set their pupils to practice the arts of dynamic geometry and numerology in order to exercise the faculty of intuition, through which may be apprehended the essential laws of cosmic motion. In these institutions personal opinions and systems of belief, however ingeniously contrived, were disregarded. The conflict of ideas was seen as one manifestation of the perpetual interaction of elemental forces, and decisions were not reached simply in accordance with the expediency of the time; every feature of existence was determined by reference to a living canon of proportion, formed after the perfect model of the cosmos, and also reflecting the structure of the human mind.” ~John Michell

Teachers of Experience

The primary function of the teachers in the ancient mystery schools was to show their students how to learn truth through experience. For the most part, the students were not taught spiritual facts, but instead were taught to awaken their own spiritual faculties so they could learn those facts through experience. There are two primary reasons for doing it this way. First, the student is more likely to accept the truth if he experiences it for himself. Second, the words to properly express the truth simply don’t exist. Language was created to deal with the world of matter, not spirit. When you try to explain spiritual things in language that doesn’t fit, you get distortion and misunderstandings.

Dynamic Geometry

What does Michell mean by “dynamic geometry”? How can geometry be dynamic? It is dynamic when it is more than just a branch of mathematics.cross of forces

In the Pythagorean school, geometry was studied as a spiritual subject as well as a physical one. The shapes of geometric figures was considered to be the language of the soul. Viewing certain shapes helped waken the dormant spiritual faculties in man. These faculties, in turn, often communicated with the brain-mind using geometry.

I remember having dreams where the sky was full of flying saucers and they were forming groups in basic geometric shapes. I had that dream several times, which is usually an indication that the dream is conveying important information. Yet they all happened long before I learned that geometry is the language of the soul. The earliest known symbol for God uses two simple geometric shapes. Its a circle representing the sun with a simple cross over it. Ancient writings often mention various shapes, and few realize that it is an attempt to communicate something to the soul.

Intuition

We can exercise our intuition in many ways. Understanding the meaning of geometric shapes is just one of them, but an important one. Understanding how these basic shapes relate to the structure of the universe and the forces that control it is even more important. Intuition helps us understand dynamic geometry and dynamic geometry helps strengthen intuition. Continue reading “Dynamic Geometry and Learning Truth”

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divine science, mystery school students, Pythagoras

Pythagoras: Mystical Philosopher and Mathematician

“Pythagoras was said to have been the first man to call himself a philosopher; in fact, the world is indebted to him for the word philosopher. Before that time, the wise men called themselves sages, which was interpreted to mean those who know. Pythagoras was more modest. He coined the word philosopher, which he defined as one who is attempting to find out. … He traveled among the Jews and was instructed by the Rabbins concerning the secret traditions of Moses. … Pythagoras was initiated into the Egyptian, Babylonian, and Chaldean Mysteries.” ~Manly P Hall

Pythagoras the Philosopher

Many know of Pythagoras as primarily a mathematician. In truth, he was a spiritual philosopher more than a mathematician. His studies in the field of mathematics were primarily to understand the relationship of mathematics to creation and to the development of the soul. His mathematical studies were mainly to help in the study of geometry as the language of the soul. He, like many other spiritual philosophers believe the soul to understand geometric shapes rather than words, or at least to be affected by them. (When I was in High School, geometry was my favorite math class. Now I understand why.)

I was not aware, however, that he invented the word “philosopher” to describe himself as a seeker of truth because he thought the term “sage” was too egoic. It makes perfect sense, of course, that one interested in spiritual growth and higher states of consciousness would shun anything that boosts the ego. Not that he or any sensible spiritual teacher taught that the ego should be utterly destroyed. He taught rather that it had to be kept in check with the spirit and soul taking the lead rather than the ego. Continue reading “Pythagoras: Mystical Philosopher and Mathematician”

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